Chappaqua Children Build, Decorate Gingerbread Houses

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Third-grader Aidan Foster and his sixth-grade sister, Ava, worked on a pair of cottage homes Tuesday night in the Chappaqua Library Theater.
Third-grader Aidan Foster and his sixth-grade sister, Ava, worked on a pair of cottage homes Tuesday night in the Chappaqua Library Theater. Photo Credit: Michael Nocella
Sofia Jacobson wanted to make a New York City-themed gingerbread house.
Sofia Jacobson wanted to make a New York City-themed gingerbread house. Photo Credit: Michael Nocella
Sixth-grader Sophia Pao tried her hand at the Eiffel Tower on Tuesday at the Chappaqua Library's gingerbread house decorating event.
Sixth-grader Sophia Pao tried her hand at the Eiffel Tower on Tuesday at the Chappaqua Library's gingerbread house decorating event. Photo Credit: Michael Nocella
Children's librarians Kelly-Ann Gardella, left, and Mercy Garland set the bar high with a barnyard gingerbread setting.
Children's librarians Kelly-Ann Gardella, left, and Mercy Garland set the bar high with a barnyard gingerbread setting. Photo Credit: Michael Nocella
Christopher Correia, left, and his brother, Peter, were on their way to making a gingerbread lighthouse.
Christopher Correia, left, and his brother, Peter, were on their way to making a gingerbread lighthouse. Photo Credit: Michael Nocella
Fourth-grader Spencer Li and his baby sitter, Loandri Smit, loaded on the decorations.
Fourth-grader Spencer Li and his baby sitter, Loandri Smit, loaded on the decorations. Photo Credit: Michael Nocella

CHAPPAQUA, N.Y. – Every kid wants to live in – or at least build – a house made of candy.

Tuesday evening, more than 20 Chappaqua kindergartners and grade-schoolers gathered in the Chappaqua Library Theater to decorate gingerbread houses, helping make sure their sweet-tooth imaginations did not go to waste. They were joined by their parents and Chappaqua children’s librarians.

“The library has been doing this every year, for a long time. Before I got here,” said children’s librarian Mercy Garland. “It’s a great community event for the kids and family this time of year.”

All participants had to register in advance, in addition to being responsible for their “foundation,” which could have consisted of cardboard or real gingerbread. The library supplied the decorations.

“We always see some really creative things come in,” said children’s librarian Kelly-Ann Gardella. “Last year we had a robot and a "Star Wars"-themed house. It’s a great opportunity for kids to be creative.”

This year’s batch was no different, as designs included a barn, a New York City skyscraper, a lighthouse and the Eiffel Tower. Not surprisingly, with an abundance of decorative materials on hand, most participants lathered their homes in white frosting and an assortment of candy favorites.

“I want my house to be realistic,” said third-grader Aidan Foster, who was working on a pair of cottages with his older sister Ava.

“I just want them to be delicious,” she said.

A perfect construction plan for any holiday architect.

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